Seattle Times dishes up their opinion in celebration of Spring just in time for Easter Meals.

| April 3, 2010
Café Campagne

1600 Post Alley (Pike Place Market), Seattle, 206-728-2233; http://www.cafecampagne.com/

Brunch hours: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays

Other French restaurants can only dream of such surroundings — the call of fishmongers and fruit sellers, the sight of cheesemakers and croissant bakers. This Post Alley province of le petit déjeuner has all that and more. Stop into the bar for a light repast: a flute of true Champagne to sip while nibbling on a pan-bagnat. Or relax at cafe tables, elbow-to-elbow with Market denizens delving into brunch classics like Mr. and Mrs. Croque or a wedge of quiche du jour. Is that a breeze rushing by the sidewalk tables? Ward off the chill with cassoulet spooned from its bubbling cocotte by a white apron-clad waiter, or revel in poached oeufs en meurette — its bacon- and foie gras-infused sauce a rich dip for a haystack of finely cut frites.

Tilth
1411 N. 45th St., Seattle, 206-633-0801, http://www.tilthrestaurant.com/
Brunch hours: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays
Point your compass northwest and behold brunch in a Wallingford bungalow born as a bow to organics. The cockeyed optimist who owns this homey haute-elle is a James Beard award-winner whose mini duck burgers hold signature status on the seasonal menu. The house relies on sous-vide cookery to concentrate flavors and on area foragers, fishers, farmers and ranchers for local ingredients. Among them: the wild mushrooms folded into your omelet, the smoked salmon starring in your hash and eggs, and the dried fruit dappling your muesli. And — my country ’tis of thee, indeed! — that’s Skagit County chicken flavoring the surprisingly light gravy that smothers homemade cheddar biscuits, and it’s a dish that had me crowing all day.
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